New KIDS COUNT report elevates equity issues among Colorado children

Whether our family has been here for generations or we’re brand new Coloradans, we all hope to leave our children a better world than the one we inherited. Unfortunately, too many Colorado kids face barriers to opportunity because of their race or ethnicity. This year’s KIDS COUNT in Colorado! report from the Colorado Children’s Campaign delves into disparities in child well-being based on race and ethnicity to show us where we can, and must, do better at creating equitable opportunities for children.

The 2017 KIDS COUNT report draws on the voices and experiences of Coloradans across the state to tell the story of how a complex history of policies and practices has created barriers to opportunity for children and families of color. These voices, combined with research and data, open a window into a new way of looking at how disparities in health and education are the result of past public policies. Coloradans have a history of working together on behalf of kids and, although we have been shaped by the past, we are not powerless in changing the future. In fact, this report shows us that intentional public policy decisions created these disparities—and they can end them.

Colorado’s future depends on the well-being of our state’s child population, which is growing and becoming increasingly diverse each year. By focusing KIDS COUNT on the question, “What is driving disparities between children of color and their white peers?” the Colorado Children’s Campaign is starting an important conversation about equity that calls upon us to lean into our discomfort and to let our values guide us. Join us in reading KIDS COUNT in Colorado! on the Children’s Campaign’s website at http://bit.ly/2oFc2QI, then let’s work together to find bold solutions that ensure every child in Colorado has access to opportunity.

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